Female, 20, psychology undergrad. In fact, please feel free to ask me psychology questions, and I'll answer them to the best of my ability. Folk metal enthusiast and resident angry feminist.

24th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from welcome to the science hospital with 921 notes

lamarghe73:

Milicent Patrick (1915 - 1998).

Born Mildred Elizabeth Fulvia di Rossi, Milicent Patrick is one of many Hollywood unsung artists. She is the mind that created from scratch such iconic monsters as the mutants in “This Island Earth”, all the masks in “Abbott and Costello Meet Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde”, the Mole People from the film of the same name, and created the Xenomorph for “It Came from Outer Space”.

But her biggest success was the design and creation of one of the most iconic cinematic monsters of all time, the Gill-Man from “The Creature From the Black Lagoon”.

Tagged: filmspecial effects

Source: lamarghe73

24th April 2014

Photo reblogged from Serious Mental Illness Blog with 67 notes

smiliu:

Here’s What It’s Like to Have the Mental Illness Associated With Psychopaths
By Anonymous, Business Insider
An anonymous user responded with a first-person account of having Antisocial Personality Disorder, the official name for a mental illness most people know as sociopathy. The disorder, which is notoriously difficult to treat, is characterized by a lack of empathy and inability to form close relationships. We have printed the entire response below.
I’d like to answer this anonymously, so bear with me.
First of all, although it is a common misconception, having an antisocial personality disorder is different from the term “psychopath.” A sociopath can have a wide range of symptoms, meaning that not every sociopath is like Dexter, or feels the need to kill and destroy in an attempt to feel emotions or cope. Sociopaths or psychopaths can be anywhere on a large spectrum ranging from the type of behavior seen by remorseless serial killers, or the behavior seen as a general disorder in emotional capabilities or accuracy.
In my case, although as of yet there is no sure-fire method of diagnosing ASPD, I was given the label because I exhibited many of the symptoms associated with the disorder. As a child I was stubborn and had trouble maintaining friendships. I didn’t have any trouble making friends, but social norms were foreign to me and I usually lost interest in friendship. My parents described my behavior as cold and distant. I had absolutely no sense of loyalty and would use people to get what I wanted.
I can’t say that there is NO effective treatment for the problem, but in my case, I was institutionalized for many months and I was essentially re-trained how to survive in a society that I can’t understand. Since many of the problems I had evolved throughout my childhood and early teens, my parents decided to face the problem in a very extreme way, hence the institutionalization.
Today, most people wouldn’t know that I have issues. I moved to a new area to ease the transition.
Not all people who show symptoms of ASPD will involve themselves in criminal activity. Although I’ve had a few minor brushes with the law, I am not a criminal and I have no desire to break laws. Also, contrary to popular belief, I DO experience emotions. I experience emotions which are much less intense, I imagine, than others, but they are emotions nevertheless. Most of the time I have difficulty identifying what I am feeling, and my emotions are often inappropriate in context with the situation.
I have almost no ability to empathize with others, and even at the death of those close to me, I did not feel sorrow. Instead, I knew that I should be feeling sorrow, and so I exhibited the emotions that I knew I should be feeling. This was the training and treatment that I received. I was taught about my disorder, I was told that I was different from most of the world, but I was also taught that I should attempt to integrate.
One of the biggest problems with ASPD is the sense of alienation. This alienation is often the only thing which someone with ASPD can truly understand. The alienation is clear and it is not confusing. However, if i allow the alienation to define me, I become less willing to fight antisocial urges. These antisocial actions are what cause many people with ASPD to break the law or hurt others.
Although I cannot compare the treatment I received with other methods, I would say that the training I was given helped me to blend into my society and become a part of it. Pretending to feel things which I do not feel makes me appear normal, and appearing normal makes the alienation less intense, which in turn helps the ASPD. There is no firmly recognized method to treat people who have ASPD or who can be classified as psychopaths.
One of the main problems is that, compared to other mental illnesses, there is a very small knowledge base on the subject. Few functioning people with an antisocial personality disorder seek out therapy. Most of the people that society recognizes as sociopaths or psychopaths are in prison or deeply disturbed. There is a huge social stigma in relation to people who can be classified as sociopaths or psychopaths (not unfounded, I’ll admit, there is good cause). But this general mistrust makes it difficult to get a job, make friends, or date people (yes I do date) should the fact that I have a diagnosis of ASPD come to light.
Once, a well meaning, but poorly-informed neighbor put my name and address on a map online, marking me as a dangerous member of society. I had been attending therapy nearby, and I naively thought that he wouldn’t judge since his young son has schizophrenia. I was forced to quit my job and move away after the whole situation started interfering with my work and general desire to be left alone.
Despite my ASPD, I am a functioning member of society.
With continuing therapy, and the understanding that it is okay for me to be different, I have the freedom to live where I want, have friendships, work, and go to school.



 
For more mental health news, Click Here to access the Serious Mental Illness Blog

smiliu:

Here’s What It’s Like to Have the Mental Illness Associated With Psychopaths

By Anonymous, Business Insider

An anonymous user responded with a first-person account of having Antisocial Personality Disorder, the official name for a mental illness most people know as sociopathy. The disorder, which is notoriously difficult to treat, is characterized by a lack of empathy and inability to form close relationships. We have printed the entire response below.

I’d like to answer this anonymously, so bear with me.

First of all, although it is a common misconception, having an antisocial personality disorder is different from the term “psychopath.” A sociopath can have a wide range of symptoms, meaning that not every sociopath is like Dexter, or feels the need to kill and destroy in an attempt to feel emotions or cope. Sociopaths or psychopaths can be anywhere on a large spectrum ranging from the type of behavior seen by remorseless serial killers, or the behavior seen as a general disorder in emotional capabilities or accuracy.

In my case, although as of yet there is no sure-fire method of diagnosing ASPD, I was given the label because I exhibited many of the symptoms associated with the disorder. As a child I was stubborn and had trouble maintaining friendships. I didn’t have any trouble making friends, but social norms were foreign to me and I usually lost interest in friendship. My parents described my behavior as cold and distant. I had absolutely no sense of loyalty and would use people to get what I wanted.

I can’t say that there is NO effective treatment for the problem, but in my case, I was institutionalized for many months and I was essentially re-trained how to survive in a society that I can’t understand. Since many of the problems I had evolved throughout my childhood and early teens, my parents decided to face the problem in a very extreme way, hence the institutionalization.

Today, most people wouldn’t know that I have issues. I moved to a new area to ease the transition.

Not all people who show symptoms of ASPD will involve themselves in criminal activity. Although I’ve had a few minor brushes with the law, I am not a criminal and I have no desire to break laws. Also, contrary to popular belief, I DO experience emotions. I experience emotions which are much less intense, I imagine, than others, but they are emotions nevertheless. Most of the time I have difficulty identifying what I am feeling, and my emotions are often inappropriate in context with the situation.

I have almost no ability to empathize with others, and even at the death of those close to me, I did not feel sorrow. Instead, I knew that I should be feeling sorrow, and so I exhibited the emotions that I knew I should be feeling. This was the training and treatment that I received. I was taught about my disorder, I was told that I was different from most of the world, but I was also taught that I should attempt to integrate.

One of the biggest problems with ASPD is the sense of alienation. This alienation is often the only thing which someone with ASPD can truly understand. The alienation is clear and it is not confusing. However, if i allow the alienation to define me, I become less willing to fight antisocial urges. These antisocial actions are what cause many people with ASPD to break the law or hurt others.

Although I cannot compare the treatment I received with other methods, I would say that the training I was given helped me to blend into my society and become a part of it. Pretending to feel things which I do not feel makes me appear normal, and appearing normal makes the alienation less intense, which in turn helps the ASPD. There is no firmly recognized method to treat people who have ASPD or who can be classified as psychopaths.

One of the main problems is that, compared to other mental illnesses, there is a very small knowledge base on the subject. Few functioning people with an antisocial personality disorder seek out therapy. Most of the people that society recognizes as sociopaths or psychopaths are in prison or deeply disturbed. There is a huge social stigma in relation to people who can be classified as sociopaths or psychopaths (not unfounded, I’ll admit, there is good cause). But this general mistrust makes it difficult to get a job, make friends, or date people (yes I do date) should the fact that I have a diagnosis of ASPD come to light.

Once, a well meaning, but poorly-informed neighbor put my name and address on a map online, marking me as a dangerous member of society. I had been attending therapy nearby, and I naively thought that he wouldn’t judge since his young son has schizophrenia. I was forced to quit my job and move away after the whole situation started interfering with my work and general desire to be left alone.

Despite my ASPD, I am a functioning member of society.

With continuing therapy, and the understanding that it is okay for me to be different, I have the freedom to live where I want, have friendships, work, and go to school.

 




For more mental health news, 
Click Here to access the Serious Mental Illness Blog

Tagged: mental illnesspsychopathysociopathymisconceptions

24th April 2014

Photo reblogged from Messenger of Magic and Damnation with 11,598 notes

twcflorkin:

sasukesqueen:

i think im gonna cry


that doesn’t mean it isn’t racist, Avril, you fucking nerd weeb.

twcflorkin:

sasukesqueen:

i think im gonna cry

that doesn’t mean it isn’t racist, Avril, you fucking nerd weeb.

Tagged: beautiful

Source: sasukesqueen

23rd April 2014

Photoset reblogged from call me queer and i'll burn you alive asshole with 515 notes

policymic:

Interactive site proves the War on Drugs has been undeniably racist

On Tuesday, the American Civil Liberties Union launched The Uncovery, an interactive website that documents the myriad injustices linked to marijuana arrests and convictions. With special focus on the law’s racial disparities, the site allows users to take statistics and share them with friends or legislators as engaging customizable graphics. The whole process takes 60 seconds or less.

The site draws its facts from the ACLU’s “War on Marijuana” report, which incorporates video, graphics, arrest rate statistics and opportunities for citizens to “take action.” A press release characterizes The Uncovery as a “simple, elegant advocacy tool” for marijuana legislation reform.

Read moreFollow policymic

Tagged: criminal justiceracismmarijauna

Source: policymic

23rd April 2014

Photo reblogged from I'm not even supposed to be here today. with 30,666 notes


Bold & Brash S. Tentacles, 2001

Bold & Brash
S. Tentacles, 2001

Source: sanderwallace

23rd April 2014

Photo reblogged from Untitled with 41,610 notes

Tagged: kitties

Source: sofapizza.me

22nd April 2014

Photo reblogged from Messenger of Magic and Damnation with 61 notes

Tagged: the cage

Source: weirdnessisgood

22nd April 2014

Photo reblogged from Frozen fractals all around with 5,361 notes

Source: sorceressrinoa

21st April 2014

Photo reblogged from I likes to science with 2,156 notes

seriouslyamerica:

apersnicketylemon:

fandomsandfeminism:

unapologetically-indie:

Anyway you dice it, nothing is going to change the fact that children need both a mother and a father.

Ah, homophobia, transphobia, and good old cis straight prejudice. (Oh, also a prejudice against single parent homes! Yay! So many problems!) 
Did you know that there’s actually been STUDIES about the sorts of environments that children do well in? And you know what they found? The gender of the parents has no impact on the well being of a child. 
Like, cornbreaded christ, stop trying to use “but the children!” as an excuse for bigotry. 

Besides, children DON’T need a mother and a father. What they DO need is a stable home with someone who loves them more than anything who can meet their needs and some of their wants. Trans people and gay and lesbian couples can provide those just fine. We’re not incapable of love just because our gender or sexuality is not cis/straight.
This also implies a single mother or father is incapable of ‘loving’ their children enough or providing stability or a good environment. You’re against single parents too then OP?

Hey, daughter of lesbian moms here! About to finish my master’s degree - if only I’d had a dad I might not be such a degenerate failure of a human being.It’s too bad my parents taught me that LOVE (not gender) makes a family, and that kindness and empathy are important./sarcasm

seriouslyamerica:

apersnicketylemon:

fandomsandfeminism:

unapologetically-indie:

Anyway you dice it, nothing is going to change the fact that children need both a mother and a father.

Ah, homophobia, transphobia, and good old cis straight prejudice. (Oh, also a prejudice against single parent homes! Yay! So many problems!) 

Did you know that there’s actually been STUDIES about the sorts of environments that children do well in? And you know what they found? The gender of the parents has no impact on the well being of a child. 

Like, cornbreaded christ, stop trying to use “but the children!” as an excuse for bigotry. 

Besides, children DON’T need a mother and a father. What they DO need is a stable home with someone who loves them more than anything who can meet their needs and some of their wants. Trans people and gay and lesbian couples can provide those just fine. We’re not incapable of love just because our gender or sexuality is not cis/straight.

This also implies a single mother or father is incapable of ‘loving’ their children enough or providing stability or a good environment. You’re against single parents too then OP?

Hey, daughter of lesbian moms here! About to finish my master’s degree - if only I’d had a dad I might not be such a degenerate failure of a human being.

It’s too bad my parents taught me that LOVE (not gender) makes a family, and that kindness and empathy are important.

/sarcasm

Tagged: people who think like the op are really pitiabledo you really have that little faith in parents?lgbt

Source: unapologetically-indie

21st April 2014

Quote reblogged from I likes to science with 10,204 notes

Society often blurs the lines between drag queens and trans women. This is highly problematic, because many people believe that, like drag queens, trans women go home, take off their wigs and chest plates, and walk around as men. Trans womanhood is not a performance or costume.
— Janet Mock, Redefining Realness (via inextinguishabledesires)

Tagged: lgbttrans issues

Source: inextinguishabledesires

21st April 2014

Post reblogged from TW: BDSM with 23 notes

survivorsofkinkunite:

If you say “it’s not rape if you don’t say no”, you’re a fucking victim-blaming abuser. End of story.

Tagged: kinkshitsrapeabuse

Source: survivorsofkinkunite

21st April 2014

Post reblogged from I likes to science with 37,974 notes

mushroomsugar:

*writes “like” on a cigarette and puts it in my mouth*

It’s a simile.

Tagged: yessssmetaphor jokes

Source: mushroomsugar