Female, 20, psychology undergrad. In fact, please feel free to ask me psychology questions, and I'll answer them to the best of my ability. Folk metal enthusiast and resident angry feminist.

17th April 2014

Photo reblogged from >yfw you forgot to activate your almonds with 76,913 notes

missingkitsune:

"There there, I’m sorry I scared you. *pats and kisses* you’re a good dog, good dog."

missingkitsune:

"There there, I’m sorry I scared you. *pats and kisses* you’re a good dog, good dog."

Tagged: d'aww

Source: lawebloca

17th April 2014

Post reblogged from kink shamer with 21,044 notes

howlsmoving-asshole:

howllor:

oh my godddddd there is a new swedish reality tv show where they are tracking down internet trolls and confronting them about the death threats they’ve sent to people, since it’s actually illegal.

watching them try to explain how it’s not them is the best entertainment i’ve ever seen.

this episode ended with them fining him 5000 SEK to be paid to the victim!

guess what America should do

What is this called? I need to watch this.

Source: howllor

17th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from BuzzFeed with 2,724 notes

buzzfeed:

19 Vintage Easter Bunny Photos That Will Make Your Skin Crawl

Tagged: happy easter

16th April 2014

Photo reblogged from My Life As Vianey with 42 notes

Tagged: metaphor jokes

16th April 2014

Quote reblogged from I likes to science with 283,635 notes

People run from rain but
sit
in bathtubs full of
water.

Charles Bukowski (via bittersweetsongs)

Wow bukowski so profound do you also bathe fully clothed you dickhead. “Oohh isn’t it funny that a person will eat when they’re hungry but will duck if you throw an apple at their face”

(via coolestpriest)

Source: cachaemic

16th April 2014

Photo reblogged from I likes to science with 1,480 notes

unsuccessfulmetalbenders:

FOR EVERYONE WHO JUST SAID I WAS LYING WHY WOULD I PLAY ABOUT THIS

unsuccessfulmetalbenders:

FOR EVERYONE WHO JUST SAID I WAS LYING WHY WOULD I PLAY ABOUT THIS

Tagged: IS THIS REAL LIFEwhat the actual shit

Source: unsuccessfulmetalbenders

16th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from I likes to science with 254,682 notes

retrogradeworks:

I love to see children who are so delicate and gentle with animals.  It warms my heart amidst a sea of brats pulling cats’ tails and getting whacked.

Also JESUS THAT’S A SNUGGLY CHICKEN.

Tagged: i can agree

Source: hannahbowl

16th April 2014

Photo reblogged from Serious Mental Illness Blog with 27 notes

smiliu:

Panel discusses mental health care race gap
Karina Shedrofsky, The Diamondback
Even as mental health awareness and services increase, university officials said, mental health experiences vary for people of different races, a disparity they highlighted in a panel discussion last night. 
As part of Stress Less Week, an awareness campaign aimed at reducing stress and the stigma associated with mental illness, the university’s chapter of Active Minds, the Counseling Center and the Division of Student Affairs’ Diversity Advisory Council hosted a panel to address mental health resources and mental health in communities of color. A small crowd attended the event in the Benjamin Banneker room in Stamp Student Union.
Charmaine Wilson-Jones, the Diversity Advisory Council’s chairwoman, said the council wanted to host a mental health event focusing on unaddressed or underserved communities. 
“We feel like there’s a huge push for mental health right now, on campus and off,” said Wilson-Jones, a junior government and politics major. “But a lot of minority students — and people of color in general — are being left out of that discussion, and we wanted to find a way to sort of bring those two sides together.” 
Wilson-Jones connected with members of Active Minds and brought together Howard Lloyd, a doctoral intern at the Counseling Center; Na-Yeun Choi, a fifth-year psychology doctoral student; and James Houle, a Counseling Center staff psychologist. 
Wilson-Jones began the discussion by asking the speakers about their personal experiences with diversity and mental health. Each panelist identified as a different race and had different experiences but agreed that students of color face specific sources of stress and anxiety that must be combated.
“For students of color, there’s a real feeling or idea that, ‘If I go to talk to someone, they aren’t going to look like me or understand where I’m coming from. And how can someone who doesn’t look like me understand where I’m coming from?’” Lloyd said. 
Choi, a first-generation immigrant from Korea, discussed the stereotypes that can impact an individual’s mental health, such as the model minority myth surrounding Asian-American and Pacific Islander communities that creates pressure to live up to an ideal of perfectionism.
She said students of color can face numerous barriers when seeking help.   
“Maybe loss of faith and kind of bringing some shame to the families in their own community, especially in more communal and non-individual communities — they tend to look more into this concept of you really are supporting your whole community and family,” Choi said. 
Each speaker mentioned the extra emotional toll racism takes on students of color, and more specifically the idea of microaggressions — subtle and small acts of discrimination or prejudice that students who identify as white might not notice. 
“Somebody once described a million little paper cuts as a form of microaggression,” Houle said. “Over time one paper cut might not hurt, but a thousand or a million paper cuts will hurt.” 
Lloyd, who identifies as African-American, recognized that students might fear seeking help from people they don’t think they can relate to or who won’t understand their stresses and problems because of difference in race or ethnicity. 
To combat the stigma surrounding mental health issues in multiracial communities, the panelists said, talking about the issues and making students more aware of the realities of counseling — such as what psychologists and psychiatrists look like and how sessions are typically run — can go a long way.
Houle said the Counseling Center reaches out to explain the services they offer and meet people to show what psychologists look like outside of pop culture depictions, he said. The center offers Students of Color Walk-In Hour sessions during which students can see a counselor without making an appointment.
Mudit Verma, a senior psychology major and Active Minds’ fundraising director, appreciated the panelists’ advice on how to productively react when a friend or family member says something offensive that might discourage someone from seeking professional help. 
“Their responses really intrigued me,” he said. “Using objective information is really a powerful tool to sort of convince an audience.”
Josh Ratner, the Student Government Association’s student affairs vice president, said that identifying the different ways communities perceive mental health is important when trying to improve services.
“It’s really interesting to see how different communities value, stigmatize, prioritize mental health,” the junior government and politics major said. “And it’s great to see that the university has programs to try and reach out to different communities that might have more stigma associated with mental health.” 



 


For more mental health news, Click Here to access the Serious Mental Illness Blog

smiliu:

Panel discusses mental health care race gap

Karina Shedrofsky, The Diamondback

Even as mental health awareness and services increase, university officials said, mental health experiences vary for people of different races, a disparity they highlighted in a panel discussion last night. 

As part of Stress Less Week, an awareness campaign aimed at reducing stress and the stigma associated with mental illness, the university’s chapter of Active Minds, the Counseling Center and the Division of Student Affairs’ Diversity Advisory Council hosted a panel to address mental health resources and mental health in communities of color. A small crowd attended the event in the Benjamin Banneker room in Stamp Student Union.

Charmaine Wilson-Jones, the Diversity Advisory Council’s chairwoman, said the council wanted to host a mental health event focusing on unaddressed or underserved communities. 

“We feel like there’s a huge push for mental health right now, on campus and off,” said Wilson-Jones, a junior government and politics major. “But a lot of minority students — and people of color in general — are being left out of that discussion, and we wanted to find a way to sort of bring those two sides together.” 

Wilson-Jones connected with members of Active Minds and brought together Howard Lloyd, a doctoral intern at the Counseling Center; Na-Yeun Choi, a fifth-year psychology doctoral student; and James Houle, a Counseling Center staff psychologist. 

Wilson-Jones began the discussion by asking the speakers about their personal experiences with diversity and mental health. Each panelist identified as a different race and had different experiences but agreed that students of color face specific sources of stress and anxiety that must be combated.

“For students of color, there’s a real feeling or idea that, ‘If I go to talk to someone, they aren’t going to look like me or understand where I’m coming from. And how can someone who doesn’t look like me understand where I’m coming from?’” Lloyd said. 

Choi, a first-generation immigrant from Korea, discussed the stereotypes that can impact an individual’s mental health, such as the model minority myth surrounding Asian-American and Pacific Islander communities that creates pressure to live up to an ideal of perfectionism.

She said students of color can face numerous barriers when seeking help.   

“Maybe loss of faith and kind of bringing some shame to the families in their own community, especially in more communal and non-individual communities — they tend to look more into this concept of you really are supporting your whole community and family,” Choi said. 

Each speaker mentioned the extra emotional toll racism takes on students of color, and more specifically the idea of microaggressions — subtle and small acts of discrimination or prejudice that students who identify as white might not notice. 

“Somebody once described a million little paper cuts as a form of microaggression,” Houle said. “Over time one paper cut might not hurt, but a thousand or a million paper cuts will hurt.” 

Lloyd, who identifies as African-American, recognized that students might fear seeking help from people they don’t think they can relate to or who won’t understand their stresses and problems because of difference in race or ethnicity. 

To combat the stigma surrounding mental health issues in multiracial communities, the panelists said, talking about the issues and making students more aware of the realities of counseling — such as what psychologists and psychiatrists look like and how sessions are typically run — can go a long way.

Houle said the Counseling Center reaches out to explain the services they offer and meet people to show what psychologists look like outside of pop culture depictions, he said. The center offers Students of Color Walk-In Hour sessions during which students can see a counselor without making an appointment.

Mudit Verma, a senior psychology major and Active Minds’ fundraising director, appreciated the panelists’ advice on how to productively react when a friend or family member says something offensive that might discourage someone from seeking professional help. 

“Their responses really intrigued me,” he said. “Using objective information is really a powerful tool to sort of convince an audience.”

Josh Ratner, the Student Government Association’s student affairs vice president, said that identifying the different ways communities perceive mental health is important when trying to improve services.

“It’s really interesting to see how different communities value, stigmatize, prioritize mental health,” the junior government and politics major said. “And it’s great to see that the university has programs to try and reach out to different communities that might have more stigma associated with mental health.” 

 





For more mental health news, Click Here to access the Serious Mental Illness Blog

Tagged: healthracemental health

16th April 2014

Photo reblogged from Serious Mental Illness Blog with 124 notes

smiliu:

Mentally Ill Patients Are More Likely to End Up in Jail Rather than a Hospital
By Justin Caba, Medical Daily
Left untreated, an individual with a serious mental illness is likely to suffer further as their symptoms worsen, and their perception of the world around them gets more and more out of touch. 
A recent survey conducted by the Treatment Advocacy Center (TAC) and the National Sheriffs’ Association has found that patients with a severe mental illness are ten times more likely to end up in a state prison rather than a state mental hospital.
“The lack of treatment for seriously ill inmates is inhumane and should not be allowed in a civilized society,” lead researcher and founder of the Treatment Advocacy Center, Dr. E. Fuller Torrey, said in a statement. “This is especially true for individuals who – because of their mental illness – are not aware they are sick and therefore refuse medication.” 
Torrey and his colleagues from both the TAC and the National Sheriff’s Association probed the records of state run prisons and mental hospitals in discovering where the majority of patients with a psychiatric illness end up. Unfortunately, jails and prisons are considered the largest institutions housing individuals with a serious mental illness. Findings revealed that only 35,000 patients with a mental illness are being kept in a hospital setting compared to 356,000 who currently reside in a prison or jail cell.
Researchers called the outcome of mistreatment experienced by some mentally ill inmates “usually harmful and sometimes tragic.” Due to their erratic or disruptive behavior, many inmates with a psychiatric disorder are at danger to being beaten, raped, self-mutilated, or suicidal. Mentally ill inmates also run the risk of being thrown into solitary confinement or having physical restraints placed on them for most of their day. Although moving inmates with a serious mental illness to a more suitable institution would be in their best interest, the research team said states and counties would also benefit from the funds that would be saved on corrections.
According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness, upward of 13.6 million adults in the United States are currently living with a serious mental illness. Many Americans may be surprised to find out what exactly is included as a serious mental illness. Major depression, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), panic disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and borderline personality disorder all fall under the category of serious mental illness. One in four Americans experiences a mental illness in a given year. 



 


For more mental health news, Click Here to access the Serious Mental Illness Blog

smiliu:

Mentally Ill Patients Are More Likely to End Up in Jail Rather than a Hospital

By Justin Caba, Medical Daily

Left untreated, an individual with a serious mental illness is likely to suffer further as their symptoms worsen, and their perception of the world around them gets more and more out of touch.

A recent survey conducted by the Treatment Advocacy Center (TAC) and the National Sheriffs’ Association has found that patients with a severe mental illness are ten times more likely to end up in a state prison rather than a state mental hospital.

“The lack of treatment for seriously ill inmates is inhumane and should not be allowed in a civilized society,” lead researcher and founder of the Treatment Advocacy Center, Dr. E. Fuller Torrey, said in a statement. “This is especially true for individuals who – because of their mental illness – are not aware they are sick and therefore refuse medication.” 

Torrey and his colleagues from both the TAC and the National Sheriff’s Association probed the records of state run prisons and mental hospitals in discovering where the majority of patients with a psychiatric illness end up. Unfortunately, jails and prisons are considered the largest institutions housing individuals with a serious mental illness. Findings revealed that only 35,000 patients with a mental illness are being kept in a hospital setting compared to 356,000 who currently reside in a prison or jail cell.

Researchers called the outcome of mistreatment experienced by some mentally ill inmates “usually harmful and sometimes tragic.” Due to their erratic or disruptive behavior, many inmates with a psychiatric disorder are at danger to being beaten, raped, self-mutilated, or suicidal. Mentally ill inmates also run the risk of being thrown into solitary confinement or having physical restraints placed on them for most of their day. Although moving inmates with a serious mental illness to a more suitable institution would be in their best interest, the research team said states and counties would also benefit from the funds that would be saved on corrections.

According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness, upward of 13.6 million adults in the United States are currently living with a serious mental illness. Many Americans may be surprised to find out what exactly is included as a serious mental illness. Major depression, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), panic disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and borderline personality disorder all fall under the category of serious mental illness. One in four Americans experiences a mental illness in a given year. 

 





For more mental health news, Click Here to access the Serious Mental Illness Blog

Tagged: mental illnessincarceration

16th April 2014

Post reblogged from Denny's Diner with 4,442 notes

dennys:

Summer is just around the corner! Which means you’re probably fervently preparing for ~bikini season~, trying to get back into that beach bod! Well here are some dieting tips from Denny’s Diner to help you feel a little more comfortable this year:

  • Bikini season? Shmikini shmeason.
  • You look wonderful already.
  • Whatever makes you feel best is best.
  • There is no “right” way to look.
  • Be kind to yourself.
  • Build a sandcastle. 
  • Seriously, you look wonderful.
  • Denny’s loves you.

Surf’s up!

Tagged: dennys is so sweetthank you dennys

15th April 2014

Photo with 2 notes

At least my dogs can wear their spring fashions without worrying about how freezing it is. 

(Belle, the one on the left, has a floral bandana, while Mia, on the right, has a gingham one :3)

At least my dogs can wear their spring fashions without worrying about how freezing it is.

(Belle, the one on the left, has a floral bandana, while Mia, on the right, has a gingham one :3)

Tagged: my babieshusky mixchow mixchuskyspring fashionseriously thoughits like 30 degreesfur babies

15th April 2014

Video reblogged from >yfw you forgot to activate your almonds with 111,290 notes

hexgoddess:

drugdoer:

sqvad:

pupkid:

bevelrey:

micklovich:

this is the single most pretentious thing ive ever seen in my life im gonna vomit

AAAH

im in physical pain

JESUS CHRIST

I’m gonna start smoking again because of this I’m dead ass

this guy is the kind of guy who puts a loaded gun in his mouth to look cool omfg

Tagged: dafuq did i just watch

Source: anselgifs